Matching articles for "Zanamivir"

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2022-2023

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 28, 2022;  (Issue 1664)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu. None of the drugs that are FDA-approved for treatment of influenza have clinically relevant antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Nov 28;64(1664):185-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2022-2023 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 28, 2022;  (Issue 1664)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2022-2023
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Nov 28;64(1664):e1-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2022-2023

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 3, 2022;  (Issue 1660)
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023...
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Oct 3;64(1660):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):2-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):e1-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 4, 2021;  (Issue 1634)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Oct 4;63(1634):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Baloxavir (Xofluza) for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 11, 2021;  (Issue 1615)
The oral polymerase acidic endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza — Genentech) is now FDAapproved for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir was approved...
The oral polymerase acidic endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza — Genentech) is now FDAapproved for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir was approved for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥12 years old in 2018.1 Two neuraminidase inhibitors are FDA-approved for prophylaxis of influenza: oseltamivir (Tamiflu, and generics) in patients ≥1 year old, and zanamivir (Relenza) in patients ≥5 years old.2 Unlike oseltamivir and zanamivir, baloxavir is not FDA-approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis of influenza during institutional or community outbreaks.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Jan 11;63(1615):2-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 2, 2020;  (Issue 1610)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 2;62(1610):169-73 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 2, 2020;  (Issue 1610)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 2;62(1610):e176-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2020;  (Issue 1607)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness and symptoms that might be confused with those of COVID-19. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the 2020-2021 season are listed in Tables 2 and 3. Lower rates of influenza illness have been observed this season in the Southern Hemisphere, probably because of masking, social distancing, school closures, and travel restrictions.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Sep 21;62(1607):145-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs Past Their Expiration Date

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 27, 2020;  (Issue 1603)
Healthcare providers are often asked if drugs can be used past their expiration date. Because of legal restrictions and liability concerns, manufacturers do not sanction such use and usually do not...
Healthcare providers are often asked if drugs can be used past their expiration date. Because of legal restrictions and liability concerns, manufacturers do not sanction such use and usually do not comment on the safety or effectiveness of their products beyond the date on the label. Since our last article on this subject, more data have become available.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jul 27;62(1603):117-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 13, 2020;  (Issue 1589)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu, and generics), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza. The IV neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir (Rapivab) and the oral polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza) are approved only for treatment. All of these drugs are active against both influenza A and influenza B viruses. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 13;62(1589):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 13, 2020;  (Issue 1589)
...
View the Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 13;62(1589):e9-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Treatment and Prophylaxis of Seasonal Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2019;  (Issue 1563)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 14;61(1563):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Treatment and Prophylaxis of Seasonal Influenza 2018-2019 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2019;  (Issue 1563)
...
View the Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 14;61(1563):e11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Baloxavir Marboxil (Xofluza) for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 3, 2018;  (Issue 1561)
The FDA has approved baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza – Shionogi/Genentech), the first polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor, for single-dose, oral treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients...
The FDA has approved baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza – Shionogi/Genentech), the first polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor, for single-dose, oral treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir is the first drug with a new mechanism of action to be approved for treatment of influenza in almost 20 years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Dec 3;60(1561):193-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2017-2018

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2018;  (Issue 1537)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 1;60(1537):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2016-2017

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 2, 2017;  (Issue 1511)
Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jan 2;59(1511):1-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2015-2016

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 21, 2015;  (Issue 1484)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination1 for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination1 for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Dec 21;57(1484):169-71 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Peramivir (Rapivab): An IV Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 2, 2015;  (Issue 1461)
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had...
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had symptoms for no more than 2 days. Peramivir was available temporarily in the US during the 2009-2010 influenza season under an emergency use authorization for treatment of hospitalized patients. It has been available in some Asian countries since 2010. Peramivir is the third neuraminidase inhibitor to be approved in the US. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza in children and adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Feb 2;57(1461):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Concerns about Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 19, 2015;  (Issue 1460)
Some readers of our article on Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza have expressed concerns regarding our recommendation for use of the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to treat high-risk...
Some readers of our article on Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza have expressed concerns regarding our recommendation for use of the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to treat high-risk patients with confirmed or suspected influenza illness, citing the British Medical Journal and The Cochrane Collaboration, which have contended that there is no acceptable evidence that the drug prevents complications or hospitalizations and have questioned the completeness of the results of controlled trials conducted by the manufacturer (Roche).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jan 19;57(1460):14 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Influenza in 2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 5, 2015;  (Issue 1459)
The CDC has announced that the most common influenza viruses circulating now are influenza A H3N2, which tend to cause more severe disease, and that about half of these viruses are antigenically different from...
The CDC has announced that the most common influenza viruses circulating now are influenza A H3N2, which tend to cause more severe disease, and that about half of these viruses are antigenically different from the H3N2 strain in this year’s flu vaccine.1 Vaccination may still have a protective effect, even against drifted variants, and patients who have not received this year’s vaccine2 should be encouraged to do so.

Prompt treatment of confirmed or suspected influenza illness with antiviral drugs is recommended for hospitalized patients, for those with severe, complicated, or progressive illness, and for persons at high risk of complications: children <2 years old, adults ≥65 years old, women who are pregnant or ≤2 weeks postpartum, persons <19 years old receiving long-term aspirin therapy, morbidly obese patients (BMI ≥40), persons of American Indian/Alaskan Native heritage, residents of nursing homes or chronic-care facilities, and patients who are immunosuppressed or have chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes, or heart, lung, or kidney disease.

The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, taken within 48 hours after the onset of illness can decrease the duration of fever and symptoms in uncomplicated influenza and may reduce the incidence of pneumonia and death in high-risk patients.3 All of the influenza viruses tested to date for resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors this season have been susceptible to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.1

  1. CDC health advisory regarding the potential for circulation of drifted influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Available at http://emergency.cdc.gov. Accessed December 18, 2014.
  2. Influenza vaccine for 2014-2015. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2014; 56:97.
  3. Antiviral drugs for seasonal influenza 2014-2015. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2014; 56:121.


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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jan 5;57(1459):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2014-2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 8, 2014;  (Issue 1457)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Dec 8;56(1457):121-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2013-2014

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 20, 2014;  (Issue 1434)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jan 20;56(1434):6-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2013;  (Issue 127)
The drugs of choice for treatment of viral infections (other than HIV) and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not...
The drugs of choice for treatment of viral infections (other than HIV) and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used for the prevention of viral infections are discussed elsewhere.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Mar;11(127):19-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2012-2013

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 10, 2012;  (Issue 1405)
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and...
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Dec 10;54(1405):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2011;  (Issue 1355)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis when exposure to the disease occurs before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis when exposure to the disease occurs before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control institutional outbreaks of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. The CDC influenza web site provides frequently updated information on antiviral resistance (www.cdc.gov/flu)
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Jan 10;53(1355):1-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2010;  (Issue 98)
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been...
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used for the prevention of viral infections are discussed in another issue of Treatment Guidelines.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Oct;8(98):71-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 16, 2009;  (Issue 1325)
Currently circulating influenza virus is almost universally pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1, but seasonal influenza strains could also appear soon. Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza...
Currently circulating influenza virus is almost universally pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1, but seasonal influenza strains could also appear soon. Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of both pandemic and seasonal influenza. They may, however, interfere with the efficacy of FluMist, the live-attenuated intranasal vaccine, if they are administered within 48 hours before or <2 weeks after FluMist administration. Inactivated vaccines are not affected by antiviral drug therapy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Nov 16;51(1325):89-92 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

More Resistance to Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 26, 2009;  (Issue 1304)
Since publication of our recent article on antiviral drugs for influenza, increased levels of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have been detected in influenza A H1N1...
Since publication of our recent article on antiviral drugs for influenza, increased levels of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have been detected in influenza A H1N1 strains.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jan 26;51(1304):5-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination and can be used for treatment of patients with influenza within 2 days of the onset of illness and for chemoprophylaxis of influenza exposures...
Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination and can be used for treatment of patients with influenza within 2 days of the onset of illness and for chemoprophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. Patients who are immunocompromised or immunosuppressed, have pulmonary disease, are elderly or are healthcare workers may also be appropriate candidates for chemoprophylaxis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):98-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 22, 2007;  (Issue 1272)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control institutional influenza outbreaks and for prophylaxis in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Oct 22;49(1272):85-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2007;  (Issue 59)
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in Tables 1-6. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA....
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in Tables 1-6. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used in the prevention of viral infections are discussed in the "Adult Immunization" issue of Treatment Guidelines.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Jul;5(59):59-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 23, 2006;  (Issue 1246)
Antiviral drugs can be used to control institutional influenza outbreaks and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years...
Antiviral drugs can be used to control institutional influenza outbreaks and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine. They can also be used for early treatment of patients with influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Oct 23;48(1246):87-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 21, 2005;  (Issue 1222)
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in...
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine. Antiviral drugs can also be used for treatment of patients who develop symptoms of influenza, regardless of vaccination status.
Please see Update: Influenza Resistance to Amantadine and Rimantadine
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Nov 21;47(1222):93-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2005;  (Issue 32)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the tables that begin on page 24. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the tables that begin on page 24. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Apr;3(32):23-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 25, 2004;  (Issue 1194)
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used...
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis of unvaccinated persons who are exposed to influenza, and for treatment of both vaccinated and unvaccinated patients who develop symptoms of the disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 25;46(1194):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention 2003-2004

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 29, 2003;  (Issue 1166)
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available...
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available this year, FluMist, an intranasal vaccine and Fluzone, a pediatric formulation. Timing, indications, adverse effects, dosage and cost of the vaccines is discussed. The drugs that can be used for prophylaxis of influenza are also reviewed.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Sep 29;45(1166):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2003;  (Issue 13)
The choice of drugs for treatment of pneumonia depends on the most likely pathogens causing the infection and local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Factors such as severity of illness, presence of co-morbid...
The choice of drugs for treatment of pneumonia depends on the most likely pathogens causing the infection and local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Factors such as severity of illness, presence of co-morbid conditions and whether the infection is community or hospital-acquired also need to be considered.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Sep;1(13):83-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

FluMist: An Intranasal Live Influenza Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 19, 2003;  (Issue 1163)
FluMist (MedImmune), the first live-attenuated and first intranasally administered influenza vaccine, has been approved by the FDA to prevent influenza in healthy people 5-49 years old. Given as a nasal spray,...
FluMist (MedImmune), the first live-attenuated and first intranasally administered influenza vaccine, has been approved by the FDA to prevent influenza in healthy people 5-49 years old. Given as a nasal spray, it stimulates immunity by viral replication in the upper respiratory tract. This vaccine apparently will be advertised directly to the public as a "needle-free" alternative to intramuscular influenza vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Aug 19;45(1163):65-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention 2002-2003

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 2, 2002;  (Issue 1138)
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong-Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal...
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong-Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2002; 51:503).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Sep 2;44(1138):75-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 4, 2002;  (Issue 1123)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the table that begins on the next page. Since the last Medical Letter issue on this subject, some new drugs and some...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the table that begins on the next page. Since the last Medical Letter issue on this subject, some new drugs and some new recommendations for old drugs have been added.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Feb 4;44(1123):9-16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 3, 1999;  (Issue 1067)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the [article's]...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the [article's] table.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Dec 3;41(1067):113-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two Neuraminidase Inhibitors for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 8, 1999;  (Issue 1063)
Zanamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor taken by inhalation, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of influenza. Oseltamivir phosphate, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor, will probably be approved...
Zanamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor taken by inhalation, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of influenza. Oseltamivir phosphate, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor, will probably be approved soon.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Oct 8;41(1063):91-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction