Matching articles for "Lunesta"

Expanded Table: Some Oral Drugs for Chronic Insomnia (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 9, 2023;  (Issue 1667)
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View the Expanded Table: Some Oral Drugs for Chronic Insomnia
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jan 9;65(1667):e6-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Chronic Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 9, 2023;  (Issue 1667)
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. CBT-I includes stimulus control, sleep education and hygiene, sleep restriction, relaxation...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. CBT-I includes stimulus control, sleep education and hygiene, sleep restriction, relaxation training, and cognitive therapy. When CBT-I alone is not effective, pharmacologic treatment should be added.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jan 9;65(1667):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Daridorexant (Quviviq) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 11, 2022;  (Issue 1654)
The FDA has approved daridorexant (Quviviq – Idorsia), an orexin receptor antagonist, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia in adults. Daridorexant is the third orexin...
The FDA has approved daridorexant (Quviviq – Idorsia), an orexin receptor antagonist, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia in adults. Daridorexant is the third orexin receptor antagonist to be approved for this indication; suvorexant (Belsomra) and lemborexant (Dayvigo) were approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jul 11;64(1654):107-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 2020;  (Issue 1604)
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia,...
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria, and increase the risk of urinary tract infections. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and night sweats that may disrupt sleep. Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for both genitourinary and vasomotor symptoms.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Aug 10;62(1604):124-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lemborexant (Dayvigo) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 29, 2020;  (Issue 1601)
The FDA has approved lemborexant (Dayvigo – Eisai), an orexin receptor antagonist, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia in adults. It is the second orexin receptor antagonist to...
The FDA has approved lemborexant (Dayvigo – Eisai), an orexin receptor antagonist, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia in adults. It is the second orexin receptor antagonist to be approved for this indication; suvorexant (Belsomra) was the first.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jun 29;62(1601):97-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Chronic Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 17, 2018;  (Issue 1562)
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. Pharmacologic treatment should be used in addition to CBT-I when CBT-I alone is not...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. Pharmacologic treatment should be used in addition to CBT-I when CBT-I alone is not effective.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Dec 17;60(1562):201-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Oral Hypnotics for Insomnia (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 17, 2018;  (Issue 1562)
...
View the Expanded Table: Some Oral Hypnotics for Insomnia
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Dec 17;60(1562):e209-13 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 7, 2016;  (Issue 1507)
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary and vasomotor. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can cause vaginal and vulvar burning and irritation, pain during intercourse, and...
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary and vasomotor. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can cause vaginal and vulvar burning and irritation, pain during intercourse, and an increased risk of urinary tract infections. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and night sweats that may disrupt sleep.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Nov 7;58(1507):142-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 6, 2015;  (Issue 1472)
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications, and "natural" remedies. Behavioral approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which are not...
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications, and "natural" remedies. Behavioral approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which are not discussed here, are also used. Pharmacologic treatment and behavioral therapy are often combined.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jul 6;57(1472):95-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Suvorexant (Belsomra) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 2, 2015;  (Issue 1463)
The FDA has approved suvorexant (Belsomra – Merck), the first orexin receptor antagonist to become available in the US, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance...
The FDA has approved suvorexant (Belsomra – Merck), the first orexin receptor antagonist to become available in the US, for treatment of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Mar 2;57(1463):29-31 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Lowering the Dose of Lunesta

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 9, 2014;  (Issue 1444)
The FDA has required the manufacturer of eszopiclone (Lunesta – Sunovion), a benzodiazepine receptor agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia, to lower the current recommended starting dose to 1 mg for...
The FDA has required the manufacturer of eszopiclone (Lunesta – Sunovion), a benzodiazepine receptor agonist approved for the treatment of insomnia, to lower the current recommended starting dose to 1 mg for both men and women because a new study found that an evening dose of 3 mg can impair driving skills, memory, and coordination for more than 11 hours.1 Eszopiclone’s half-life is longer than that of any other drug in its class, which includes zolpidem (Ambien, and generics) and zaleplon (Sonata, and generics).

All benzodiazepine receptor agonists may impair performance the next morning, including driving.2 Anterograde amnesia and complex sleep-related behaviors without conscious awareness may also occur. Hallucinations have been reported. Like the benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine receptor agonists are schedule IV controlled substances; withdrawal, dependence, and abuse can occur.

1. FDA Drug Safety Communication. FDA warns of next-day impairment with sleep aid Lunesta (eszopiclone) and lowers recommended dose. Available at www.fda.gov. Accessed May 29, 2014.

2. Drugs for insomnia. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2012; 10:57.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jun 9;56(1444):48 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2012;  (Issue 119)
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications and "natural" remedies. Behavioral changes are often needed as...
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications and "natural" remedies. Behavioral changes are often needed as well.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Jul;10(119):57-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Zolpidem Oral Spray (Zolpimist) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 20, 2012;  (Issue 1384)
Zolpidem oral spray (Zolpimist – NovaDel/ECR), a new formulation of the oral hypnotic zolpidem tartrate (Ambien, and others), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of insomnia characterized...
Zolpidem oral spray (Zolpimist – NovaDel/ECR), a new formulation of the oral hypnotic zolpidem tartrate (Ambien, and others), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulty falling asleep.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Feb 20;54(1384):14-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Low-Dose Doxepin (Silenor) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 4, 2010;  (Issue 1348)
The FDA has approved a new low-dose formulation of the tricyclic antidepressant doxepin (Silenor – Somaxon) for treatment of insomnia associated with sleep maintenance. The manufacturer claims that...
The FDA has approved a new low-dose formulation of the tricyclic antidepressant doxepin (Silenor – Somaxon) for treatment of insomnia associated with sleep maintenance. The manufacturer claims that this dose retains the hypnotic effect of doxepin, without typical tricyclic adverse effects. Doxepin is available generically in higher-strength capsules and in a liquid formulation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Oct 4;52(1348):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2009;  (Issue 79)
The majority of patients with insomnia do not have a predisposing psychiatric disease. Rather, untreated insomnia may be a risk factor for development of psychiatric problems such as depression or...
The majority of patients with insomnia do not have a predisposing psychiatric disease. Rather, untreated insomnia may be a risk factor for development of psychiatric problems such as depression or anxiety.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Mar;7(79):23-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That May Cause Psychiatric Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously...
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously unrecognized psychopathology, or psychosocial factors. The withdrawal of some drugs can cause symptoms such as anxiety, psychosis, delirium, agitation or depression.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):100-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2006;  (Issue 42)
Many drugs are used to treat insomnia, but for some patients nonpharmacological treatments such as changing sleep habits, relaxation training and cognitive therapy may be more effective and durable than...
Many drugs are used to treat insomnia, but for some patients nonpharmacological treatments such as changing sleep habits, relaxation training and cognitive therapy may be more effective and durable than treatment with drugs. Hypnotic drugs are generally FDA-approved only for short-term use, but in practice they often are taken much longer.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Feb;4(42):5-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ambien CR for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 5, 2005;  (Issue 1223)
Zolpidem (Ambien - Sanofi-Aventis), a nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist, is the most frequently prescribed hypnotic in the US. As its patent approaches expiration, its manufacturer has received...
Zolpidem (Ambien - Sanofi-Aventis), a nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist, is the most frequently prescribed hypnotic in the US. As its patent approaches expiration, its manufacturer has received FDA approval to market an extended-release formulation of the drug, Ambien CR. The pharmacological rationale for doing so is that short-acting hypnotics like zolpidem are more effective at inducing sleep than they are at maintaining it.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Dec 5;47(1223):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ramelteon (Rozerem) for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 7, 2005;  (Issue 1221)
Ramelteon (Rozerem - Takeda), a melatonin receptor agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulty falling asleep. Unlike all other prescription hypnotics, which are...
Ramelteon (Rozerem - Takeda), a melatonin receptor agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulty falling asleep. Unlike all other prescription hypnotics, which are classified as schedule IV drugs, ramelteon is not a controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Nov 7;47(1221):89-91 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Eszopiclone (Lunesta), a New Hypnotic

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 28, 2005;  (Issue 1203)
Eszopiclone (Lunesta - Sepracor), a benzodiazepine-like drug, has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of insomnia. It is the S-isomer of zopiclone (Imovane, and others in Canada), which has been...
Eszopiclone (Lunesta - Sepracor), a benzodiazepine-like drug, has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of insomnia. It is the S-isomer of zopiclone (Imovane, and others in Canada), which has been available in other countries for almost 20 years. Unlike similar drugs such as zolpidem (Ambien) or zaleplon (Sonata), Lunesta is not being restricted in its labeling to short-term use. Like other hypnotics, eszopiclone is a schedule IV drug.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Feb 28;47(1203):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction