Matching articles for "Naloxone"

Opioids for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 12, 2022;  (Issue 1665)
A new CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for pain recently became available. Nonopioid drugs for pain were reviewed in a previous...
A new CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for pain recently became available. Nonopioid drugs for pain were reviewed in a previous issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Dec 12;64(1665):193-200 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nalmefene Returns for Reversal of Opioid Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 5, 2022;  (Issue 1658)
The FDA has approved a generic injectable formulation of the opioid antagonist nalmefene (Purdue) for the management of known or suspected opioid overdose. Revex, the reference product, was withdrawn from...
The FDA has approved a generic injectable formulation of the opioid antagonist nalmefene (Purdue) for the management of known or suspected opioid overdose. Revex, the reference product, was withdrawn from the market in 2008 for commercial reasons.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Sep 5;64(1658):141-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Zimhi - A Higher-Dose Injectable Naloxone for Opioid Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 18, 2022;  (Issue 1648)
The FDA has approved a higher-dose injectable formulation of the opioid antagonist naloxone (Zimhi – Adamis) for emergency treatment of opioid overdose. A single IM or SC injection of the new formulation...
The FDA has approved a higher-dose injectable formulation of the opioid antagonist naloxone (Zimhi – Adamis) for emergency treatment of opioid overdose. A single IM or SC injection of the new formulation delivers 5 mg of naloxone; injectable formulations that deliver 0.4 mg or 2 mg of the drug have been available for years. Naloxone is also available in intranasal formulations for the same indication (see Table 1).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 18;64(1648):61-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Higher-Dose Naloxone Nasal Spray (Kloxxado) for Opioid Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 20, 2021;  (Issue 1633)
The FDA has approved a higher-dose intranasal naloxone formulation (Kloxxado – Hikma) for emergency treatment of opioid overdose. A single spray of the new formulation delivers 8 mg of naloxone; a...
The FDA has approved a higher-dose intranasal naloxone formulation (Kloxxado – Hikma) for emergency treatment of opioid overdose. A single spray of the new formulation delivers 8 mg of naloxone; a formulation that delivers 4 mg per spray (Narcan) was approved in 2015.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Sep 20;63(1633):151-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs Past Their Expiration Date

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 27, 2020;  (Issue 1603)
Healthcare providers are often asked if drugs can be used past their expiration date. Because of legal restrictions and liability concerns, manufacturers do not sanction such use and usually do not...
Healthcare providers are often asked if drugs can be used past their expiration date. Because of legal restrictions and liability concerns, manufacturers do not sanction such use and usually do not comment on the safety or effectiveness of their products beyond the date on the label. Since our last article on this subject, more data have become available.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jul 27;62(1603):117-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Management of Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 27, 2018;  (Issue 1554)
...
View Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Management of Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Aug 27;60(1554):e144-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lofexidine (Lucemyra) for Opioid Withdrawal

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 16, 2018;  (Issue 1551)
The FDA has approved lofexidine (Lucemyra – US WorldMeds/Salix), a centrally acting alpha2 receptor agonist, to manage withdrawal symptoms in adults abruptly stopping opioid use. Available in the UK...
The FDA has approved lofexidine (Lucemyra – US WorldMeds/Salix), a centrally acting alpha2 receptor agonist, to manage withdrawal symptoms in adults abruptly stopping opioid use. Available in the UK since 1992, lofexidine is the first nonopioid to be approved in the US for management of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Clonidine (Catapres, and generics), another central alpha2 receptor agonist, has been used off-label for this indication for many years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jul 16;60(1551):115-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Opioids for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 9, 2018;  (Issue 1544)
Use of nonopioid drugs for pain was reviewed in a previous issue. For many types of moderate to severe acute pain, acetaminophen and/or an NSAID may be as effective as an opioid. Immediate-release formulations...
Use of nonopioid drugs for pain was reviewed in a previous issue. For many types of moderate to severe acute pain, acetaminophen and/or an NSAID may be as effective as an opioid. Immediate-release formulations of full opioid agonists should generally be used for acute pain that is severe enough to require treatment with an opioid. Use of extended-release or long-acting opioid formulations initially and treatment durations >1 week have been associated with an increased risk of unintended long-term use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Apr 9;60(1544):57-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Once-Monthly Subcutaneous Buprenorphine (Sublocade) for Opioid Use Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 26, 2018;  (Issue 1541)
The FDA has approved a subcutaneous (SC) extended-release formulation of the mu-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine (Sublocade – Indivior) for once-monthly...
The FDA has approved a subcutaneous (SC) extended-release formulation of the mu-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine (Sublocade – Indivior) for once-monthly treatment of moderate to severe opioid use disorder. Sublocade is the first injectable buprenorphine product to be approved in the US. Buprenorphine is also available in sublingual formulations with or without the opioid antagonist naloxone, in a buccal formulation with naloxone, and as a subdermal implant (Probuphine).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 26;60(1541):35-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Opioid Use Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 5, 2017;  (Issue 1522)
Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease with both physical and psychiatric components. It is associated with economic hardship, social isolation, incarceration, increased rates of...
Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease with both physical and psychiatric components. It is associated with economic hardship, social isolation, incarceration, increased rates of blood-borne infections such as HIV and viral hepatitis, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and increased mortality. According to the CDC, there were 33,091 deaths related to opioid overdose in the US in 2015, more than in any previous year. Several guidelines on the management of opioid use disorder have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jun 5;59(1522):89-96 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Buprenorphine Implants (Probuphine) for Opioid Dependence

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 18, 2016;  (Issue 1499)
The FDA has approved subdermal implants of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine (Probuphine – Titan) for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence in patients stabilized on low to moderate doses of...
The FDA has approved subdermal implants of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine (Probuphine – Titan) for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence in patients stabilized on low to moderate doses of transmucosal buprenorphine. Probuphine was designed to provide continuous low levels of buprenorphine for 6 months and to safeguard against illicit use of the drug.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jul 18;58(1499):94-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Abuse-Deterrent Opioid - Xtampza ER

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 20, 2016;  (Issue 1497)
The FDA has approved Xtampza ER (Collegium), a new extended-release, abuse-deterrent capsule formulation of oxycodone, for management of pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term...
The FDA has approved Xtampza ER (Collegium), a new extended-release, abuse-deterrent capsule formulation of oxycodone, for management of pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jun 20;58(1497):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Clarification: Half-Life of Heroin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 29, 2016;  (Issue 1489)
A reader expressed concern that a statement in our article Naloxone (Narcan) Nasal Spray for Opioid Overdose (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2016; 58:1) might be misleading. We stated that heroin has a half-life of 2-6...
A reader expressed concern that a statement in our article Naloxone (Narcan) Nasal Spray for Opioid Overdose (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2016; 58:1) might be misleading. We stated that heroin has a half-life of 2-6 minutes, which is correct, but heroin is a prodrug that is rapidly metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. The risk of respiratory depression is related to those active metabolites, and it may persist well beyond the clearance of heroin from the blood.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Feb 29;58(1489):32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Naloxone (Narcan) Nasal Spray for Opioid Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 4, 2016;  (Issue 1485)
The recent increase in deaths due to overdose of heroin and prescription opioids in the US has renewed interest in the opioid antagonist naloxone, particularly in making it available to first responders and...
The recent increase in deaths due to overdose of heroin and prescription opioids in the US has renewed interest in the opioid antagonist naloxone, particularly in making it available to first responders and to relatives and close friends of persons using heroin or taking prescription opioids. IV or IM administration by healthcare professionals is preferred, but peripheral venous access may be difficult to obtain in IV drug abusers, and exposure to their blood may be hazardous.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jan 4;58(1485):1-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Abuse-Deterrent Opioid Formulations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 31, 2015;  (Issue 1476)
Development of abuse-deterrent opioid products, including reformulation of existing products, has become a priority for drug manufacturers and public health advocates. Three available opioid...
Development of abuse-deterrent opioid products, including reformulation of existing products, has become a priority for drug manufacturers and public health advocates. Three available opioid formulations, OxyContin (Purdue), Embeda (Pfizer), and Hysingla ER (Purdue), now include claims of abuse deterrence in their package inserts.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Aug 31;57(1476):119-21 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Bunavail: Another Buprenorphine/Naloxone Formulation for Opioid Dependence

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 2, 2015;  (Issue 1461)
The FDA has approved a buccal film formulation of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone (Bunavail – BioDelivery Sciences) for maintenance treatment of...
The FDA has approved a buccal film formulation of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone (Bunavail – BioDelivery Sciences) for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Sublingual tablet and film formulations of the same combination were approved earlier. The manufacturer of Bunavail claims that the new product is superior to sublingual formulations because of the convenience of buccal administration and better absorption into the blood, permitting use of lower doses.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Feb 2;57(1461):19-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: A Naloxone Auto-Injector (Evzio)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 9, 2014;  (Issue 1444)
A recent Medical Letter article reported renewed interest in the intranasal administration (off-label) of the opioid antagonist naloxone because of an increase in deaths from opioid overdose in the US.1 Now the...
A recent Medical Letter article reported renewed interest in the intranasal administration (off-label) of the opioid antagonist naloxone because of an increase in deaths from opioid overdose in the US.1 Now the FDA has approved a more practical alternative for emergency treatment of life-threatening opioid overdose in adults and children: a single-dose naloxone auto-injector (Evzio – Kaleo) for intramuscular or subcutaneous use.

Evzio will be available in kits containing two prefilled 0.4-mg auto-injectors with voice guidance and a "trainer" device that also has voice guidance, but does not contain medication or a needle. The manufacturer has not published a price for Evzio to date, but news reports indicate that each kit could cost hundreds of dollars, compared to about $20 for a standard 0.4-mg injectable dose of naloxone, which can be given intranasally.

1. Intranasal naloxone for treatment of opioid overdose. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2014; 56:21.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jun 9;56(1444):45 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Intranasal Naloxone for Treatment of Opioid Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 17, 2014;  (Issue 1438)
The recent increase in deaths from heroin overdose in the US has led to renewed interest in the opioid antagonist naloxone, particularly in making it available as an intranasal spray to paramedics and...
The recent increase in deaths from heroin overdose in the US has led to renewed interest in the opioid antagonist naloxone, particularly in making it available as an intranasal spray to paramedics and possibly to relatives and close friends of heroin users. Intravenous (IV) administration is preferred, but peripheral venous access may be difficult to obtain in IV drug abusers, and exposure to their blood may be hazardous.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Mar 17;56(1438):21-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Zubsolv) for Opioid Dependence

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 14, 2013;  (Issue 1427)
A new sublingual tablet formulation of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone (Zubsolv – Orexo) has been approved by the FDA for maintenance treatment of opioid...
A new sublingual tablet formulation of the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone (Zubsolv – Orexo) has been approved by the FDA for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Zubsolv tablets have relatively greater bioavailability than previously approved sublingual film (Suboxone) and sublingual tablet formulations of buprenorphine/naloxone and, according to an open-label survey, they taste better. The new tablets are smaller and dissolve faster than other tablet formulations, and they are individually sealed in child-resistant packaging.1

Buprenorphine is a Schedule III controlled substance that can be prescribed in an office setting by qualified physicians who register with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.2

Zubsolv is available as triangular tablets containing 1.4 mg of buprenorphine and 0.36 mg of naloxone and round tablets containing 5.7 mg of buprenorphine and 1.4 mg of naloxone, which achieve plasma concentrations of buprenorphine equivalent to those with the 2/0.5-mg and 8/2-mg strengths of other buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. A package of Zubsolv 5.7/1.4-mg tablets costs the same ($211) as a box of Suboxone 8/2-mg films. A bottle of generic buprenorphine/naloxone 8/2-mg tablets costs $250.3

1. A Fischer et al. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characterization of a novel sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet formulation in healthy volunteers. Drug Dev Ind Pharm 2013 Oct 7 (epub).

2. Buprenorphine: an alternative to methadone. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2003; 45:13.

3. Approximate wholesale acquisition cost (WAC) of 30 tablets or films. Source: $ource® Monthly (Selected from FDB MedKnowledge™) October 5, 2013. Reprinted with permission by FDB, Inc. All rights reserved. ©2013. www.fdbhealth.com/policies/drug-pricing-policy. Actual retail prices may be higher.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Oct 14;55(1427):83 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Transdermal Buprenorphine (Butrans) for Chronic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 18, 2011;  (Issue 1362)
The FDA has approved the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine in a transdermal formulation (Butrans – Purdue) for treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain. Buprenorphine has been available in the US...
The FDA has approved the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine in a transdermal formulation (Butrans – Purdue) for treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain. Buprenorphine has been available in the US for years in parenteral formulations for pain and in sublingual tablets for opioid dependence.1 Transdermal buprenorphine has been available in Europe for several years.2
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Apr 18;53(1362):31-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Heat and Transdermal Fentanyl

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 2009;  (Issue 1318)
Transdermal fentanyl (Duragesic, and others) offers a convenient delivery system for patients with chronic pain1 but it has some drawbacks. One is that exposing the patch to heat, either from an external...
Transdermal fentanyl (Duragesic, and others) offers a convenient delivery system for patients with chronic pain1 but it has some drawbacks. One is that exposing the patch to heat, either from an external source, increased exertion or possibly high fever, could increase release of the drug, which might lead to an overdose and fatal respiratory depression.2 A recent article in the NY Times about this problem may have aroused the concerns of some patients using the patches.3

First approved for marketing by the FDA in 19914, transdermal fentanyl provides continuous delivery of the drug for about 3 days. After application of the patch, a depot of fentanyl forms in the upper layers of the skin. Serum concentrations of the drug increase gradually, reaching a peak (Cmax) in 24-72 hours. According to a pharmacokinetic model mentioned in the labeling, an increase in body temperature to 40°C (104°F) could increase fentanyl serum concentrations by 33%. Local application of heat near or on a fentanyl transdermal patch also increases systemic absorption; in one study, heating the patch during the first 4 hours after application increased maximum serum concentrations nearly three-fold.5 Unintentional increases in systemic fentanyl absorption caused by a heating pad, a warming blanket used during surgery and strenuous exertion have led to respiratory depression in 3 patients.6 No reports of clinical overdosage caused by fever have been published.

Serious adverse events may require removal of the patch and administration of an opioid antagonist such as naloxone (Narcan, and others). Monitoring for hypoventilation or cognitive impairment for at least 24 hours is recommended after removing the patch because fentanyl concentrations decrease slowly (50% decrease in about 17 hours) due to continued systemic absorption from the intracutaneous reservoir.

1. Drugs for pain. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2007; 5:23.
2. FDA Alert 7/15/2005; Update 12/21/2007. Information for healthcare professionals: Fentanyl transdermal system (marketed as Duragesic and generics). Available at www.fda.gov/cder/drug/InfoSheets/HCP/fentanyl_2007HCP.htm. Accessed July 27, 2009.
3. T Brown. Doctors and nurses, still learning. New York Times, April 29, 2009. Available at NYTimes.com. Accessed July 29, 2009.
4. Transdermal fentanyl. Med Lett Drugs Ther 1992; 34:97.
5. MA Ashburn et al. The pharmacokinetics of transdermal fentanyl delivered with and without controlled heat. J Pain 2003; 4:291.
6. KA Carter. Heat-associated increase in transdermal fentanyl absorption. Am J Health Syst Pharm 2003; 60:191.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Aug 10;51(1318):64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pharmaceutical Drug Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2006;  (Issue 49)
Every pharmaceutical drug is a dose-dependent poison. This article describes the clinical presentation and treatment of some dangerous overdoses commonly reported in...
Every pharmaceutical drug is a dose-dependent poison. This article describes the clinical presentation and treatment of some dangerous overdoses commonly reported in adults.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Sep;4(49):61-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Buprenorphine: An alternative to Methadone

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 17, 2003;  (Issue 1150)
The FDA has approved the marketing of buprenorphine in sublingual tablets (Reckitt Benckiser) both alone (Subutex) and with naloxone (Suboxone) for treatment of opioid dependence. Previously available only...
The FDA has approved the marketing of buprenorphine in sublingual tablets (Reckitt Benckiser) both alone (Subutex) and with naloxone (Suboxone) for treatment of opioid dependence. Previously available only for parenteral use in treatment of pain (Buprenex, and others), it offers an alternative to methadone (Dolophine, and others), which is now often abused (New York Times, February 9, 2003; page 1). As a schedule III narcotic, buprenorphine will be subject to fewer prescribing restrictions than a schedule II drug such as methadone (MJ Kreek and FJ Vocci, J Subst Abuse Treat 2002; 23:93).w1150a
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Feb 17;45(1150):13-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 4, 2002;  (Issue 1125)
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Some patients may have mixed intoxications with complex combinations of signs and...
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Some patients may have mixed intoxications with complex combinations of signs and symptoms.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Mar 4;44(1125):21-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 10, 1996;  (Issue 974)
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Since the last Medical Letter article on this subject (volume 32, page 92, 1990), new reactions and new approaches to treating them...
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Since the last Medical Letter article on this subject (volume 32, page 92, 1990), new reactions and new approaches to treating them have been reported.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 May 10;38(974):43-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nalmefene - Long-Acting Injectable Opioid Antagonist

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 27, 1995;  (Issue 960)
Nalmefene (Revex - Ohmeda), an i methylene analog of naltrexone (Trexan), is a long-acting opioid antagonist that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for reversal of postoperative opioid...
Nalmefene (Revex - Ohmeda), an i methylene analog of naltrexone (Trexan), is a long-acting opioid antagonist that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for reversal of postoperative opioid drug effects, including respiratory depression, sedation and hypotension and for management of known or suspected opioid overdose in the emergency department. The only other opioid antagonists available in the USA are naloxone (Narcan), which is also injectable but has a short duration of action, and naltrexone, which has a long duration of action but is marketed only for oral use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Oct 27;37(960):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Naltrexone For Alcohol Dependence

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 1995;  (Issue 953)
Naltrexone (ReVia -DuPont Pharma), a long-acting oral opioid antagonist previously marketed for treatment of opioid dependence under the trade name Trexan, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug...
Naltrexone (ReVia -DuPont Pharma), a long-acting oral opioid antagonist previously marketed for treatment of opioid dependence under the trade name Trexan, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of alcohol dependence. The new trade name will now also be used for the old indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Jul 21;37(953):64-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Butorphanol Nasal Spray for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 12, 1993;  (Issue 909)
Butorphanol tartrate, a synthetic opioid agonist-antagonist analgesic previously available for injection, is now being marketed as a nasal spray (Stadol-NS - Mead Johnson). The spray was approved by the US...
Butorphanol tartrate, a synthetic opioid agonist-antagonist analgesic previously available for injection, is now being marketed as a nasal spray (Stadol-NS - Mead Johnson). The spray was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for any type of pain for which an opioid analgesic is appropriate, but the manufacturer is emphasizing use for treatment of migraine headache and postoperative pain. Drugs for pain were reviewed in the Medical Letter, volume 35, page 1, January 8, 1993.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Nov 12;35(909):105-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 6, 1993;  (Issue 902)
The well-publicized recovery from paralysis of a professional football player has recently focused attention on the growing use of drugs to minimize the effects of spinal cord injury. Methylprednisolone...
The well-publicized recovery from paralysis of a professional football player has recently focused attention on the growing use of drugs to minimize the effects of spinal cord injury. Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Solu-Medrol - Upjohn), commercially available in the USA for intravenous treatment of transplant rejection and various inflammatory and auto-immune disorders, and GM-1 ganglioside, commercially available in Italy (Sygen - Fidia) but not in the USA, are now widely used in patients with spinal cord injury.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Aug 6;35(902):72-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Laser Coronary Angioplasty

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 25, 1991;  (Issue 836)
Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), in which a balloon catheter distends the vessel at the site of obstruction (Medical Letter, 25:97, 1983), is now an established therapeutic option for...
Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), in which a balloon catheter distends the vessel at the site of obstruction (Medical Letter, 25:97, 1983), is now an established therapeutic option for treatment of patients with coronary artery disease, especially those with single-vessel disease. Major problems related to PTCA include acute occlusion during the procedure (usually caused by dissection), restenosis at the site of angioplasty, and inability to treat complete occlusions and long or ostial lesions. Some cardiologists have tried using lasers during PTCA to deal with these problems.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Jan 25;33(836):7-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dezocine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 19, 1990;  (Issue 829)
Dezocine (Dalgan - Astra), a new synthetic opioid agonist/antagonist structurally related to pentazocine (Talwin), was recently approved for parenteral use as an analgesic by the US Food and Drug...
Dezocine (Dalgan - Astra), a new synthetic opioid agonist/antagonist structurally related to pentazocine (Talwin), was recently approved for parenteral use as an analgesic by the US Food and Drug Administration.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Oct 19;32(829):95-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 1990;  (Issue 828)
...
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Oct 5;32(828):92-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That Cause Pulmonary Toxicity

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 1990;  (Issue 827)
Some commonly used systemic drugs that may cause pulmonary toxicity are listed in the table below. These adverse effects may sometimes be difficult to distinguish from the underlying disease (JAD Cooper, Jr...
Some commonly used systemic drugs that may cause pulmonary toxicity are listed in the table below. These adverse effects may sometimes be difficult to distinguish from the underlying disease (JAD Cooper, Jr et al, Am Rev Respir Dis, 133:321, 488, 1986). Pulmonary effects that are part of a generalized reaction or are indirect effects of drugs - on respiratory muscles, for example, or on the immune system - are not included here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Sep 21;32(827):88-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction